Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts

Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche DoughnutsSea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts

“Come back. Even as a shadow,
even as a dream.” – Euripides, Herakles

If you’re a close reader of my blog, you’ll know that I sometimes get fixated on certain things. And my latest obsession returns back to brioche. We seem to have a bit of a love/hate relationship – brioche and I, but lately I’ve been making, baking and thus “testing” it quite a bit.

Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts

This recipe was actually inspired by a half-batch of brioche dough I had left-over from an article written for eHow. I wanted to put the remaining dough to good use, and some sort of indulgent dough based treat seemed the right fit. So I guess you could say I created this recipe out of spontaneous necessity, but arguably, it’s become one of my personal favourites.

Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts

So, it’s time for another brioche based recipe. It’s been quite busy here in my kitchen of late so keep checking back because I have some more exciting new posts, announcements and collaborations in the mix, but for now let’ s talk about doughnuts.

Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche DoughnutsSea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts

Doughnuts are universally loved for a lot of reasons, but my number one favourite thing about them is that they bring back such fond, nostalgic memories. I have clear memories of being rewarded often with hot cinnamon sugared doughnuts as a child. And thanks to my youth, (Donut King) cinnamon doughnuts will forever be my favourite kind of indulgent treat.  Every-time I see someone dip their fingers into an oil-greased bright pink paper bag, it brings a reminiscent smile to my face.

Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts

As a sensible “adult”, I’m usually able resist the delicious temptation of a doughnut but sometimes even the strongest have their breaking points. This is the type of recipe that encourages a moment to relax, indulge and rest…we both deserve a break and comforting treat and these Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts are a very easy sell.

Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche DoughnutsSea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts

A velvety brioche dough is wrapped around a single sea salt caramel Lindor dark chocolate truffle. The little truffle “doughnuts” are then left to rise until the brioche is pillowy, puffed and encases the whole chocolate truffle entirely. The doughnuts are fried until browned and inflated then quickly tossed in a rich chocolate sugar to finish. The result is a crispy, golden and buttery brioche doughnut filled with a hot and molten sea salt caramel chocolate truffle center.

Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts

These Sea Salt Caramel Brioche Doughnuts tasted so good, that I didn’t even mind that everything in my kitchen was covered with a light slick of oil afterwards. If you too are feeling for a little indulgent reward I recommend you whip up a batch of these Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts. Just treat yourself…they are worth every ounce of effort.

Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts Sea Salt Caramel Truffle Brioche Doughnuts

Sea Salt Caramel Brioche Doughnuts
 
Serves: 30
Ingredients
  • ½ cup whole milk
  • .25 ounce / 7 gram instant dried yeast sachet
  • 10.5 ounce / 300 grams all-purpose flour
  • 6 tablespoons superfine (caster) sugar
  • 2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 3.5 ounce / 100 grams unsalted butter, very soft at room temperature, cut into ½ inch / 1.2 centimeter cubes
  • 1 tablespoon Dutch processed cocoa powder
  • 30 sea salt caramel filled Lindor truffles
  • Neutral oil, for deep-frying
Instructions
  1. In a small saucepan set over low heat, slightly warm the milk until it is lukewarm in temperature. Add in the yeast and whisk to combine. Let stand for 5 minutes.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the flour, 1 tbsp. of sugar and 1 tsp. of sea salt.
  3. Add in the yeast mixture followed by the eggs and mix on a low speed until the dough begins to come together, 2 to 3 minutes.
  4. Increase the speed to medium-high and work the dough until it is very smooth, 4 to 5 more minutes.
  5. Reduce the mixer speed to low then slowly add in the butter, a little at a time, over the course of 3 to 4 minutes – pausing half-way to scrape down the back of the bowl and hook. When the butter begins to blend in, increase the mixer speed to medium-high to fully incorporate and bring the dough together, 4 to 6 minutes longer.
  6. Form the dough into a ball and transfer it into a lightly greased bowl. Cover with a damp tea towel or plastic wrap and let it rise up in a warm spot for 2 hours or until doubled in size.
  7. Once risen, turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and lightly dust the top with flour.
  8. Roll the dough out until it is ½ inch / 1.3 centimetres in thickness.
  9. Using a biscuit cutter, or glass as a measure, cut out 2 ½ inch / 6. 3 centimeter circles, re-rolling and cutting until all the dough has been used up.
  10. Gently press a truffle into the center of each circle, and wrap the dough tightly around it, pinching the seams to enclose.
  11. Set the doughnuts on two lined baking trays, cover them with a damp tea towel and let the doughnuts rise again for up to an hour or until puffed.
  12. Meanwhile, make the chocolate sugar coating by mixing 5 tbsp. of the caster sugar with the dutch processed cocoa powder and 1 tsp. of sea salt. Set aside until needed.
  13. When ready to fry, heat about 2 inches / 5 centimetres of the oil in a heavy based saucepan until it reaches 350 F / 180 C.
  14. Fry the doughnuts in batches, about 3-4 at a time, rolling them around with a slotted spoon to help them colour evenly, until golden brown all over, roughly 3-4 minutes.
  15. Immediately remove and roll the fried doughnuts in the chocolate sugar mixture to coat them evenly then set them on paper towels to drain away any excess oil.
  16. Repeat with remaining doughnuts and serve. They’re optimal eaten warm while their insides are still molten, though you can store them, covered at room temperature.

 

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